Filmlys: En oversik

Here are some of the common types of lighting explained. From Dedo to HMI.

Tungsten lights are commonly used on film sets. The main ones are tungsten fresnel, redhead or dedolight. They are all designated by their bulb size: Fx. 1K, 5K, 10K etc. The reason they're called tungsten lights is due to the tungsten bulb inside. A tungsten bulb is what you know as a normal light bulb from the lamps in your home. A bulb like that emits a yellow light at about 3200K. What you would normally think of as indoor lighting or streetlamps, for film i.e. tungstens, are of course way more powerful than the ones in your home. Redheads are popular for smaller video productions because of their portability while fresnels are used a lot on bigger productions. The name fresnels refers to the design of the glass in front of the bulb. It has a ring-shaped pattern in it, that makes it possible to focus or spread the light by moving the glass closer to or further from the bulb.


Dedolights 
(or dedos) are really small lights used a lot for documentary / tv work, but also sometimes on bigger productions for fine-tuning of images. Almost every lighting crew carries a pack of four, because they're very portable and can fit in almost everywhere and there's a
dimmer on each one, which gives you good control.

HMI Fresnel is a common design for HMI's as well, but is mainly referred to as just HMI. HMI's have a large power output and emit a clean blue light at about 5,500K. This makes them an obvious choice for daylight situations. They are often used to create sunlight through windows and to match up existing sunlight for exteriors. HMI's are often used on bigger productions because most of them are not very portable and they're expensive to rent.

Fluorescents
Fluorescent lighting is well known from fluorescent light tubes often usedin industrial areas for cheap lighting. The problem with fluorescents are that they normally create a light that can make some colours look strange. Kino Flo's are the most commonly used fluorescents. They are completely colour-calibrated to simulate fx. tungsten light at 3200K or daylight at 5,500K without any spill to make the colours look unnatural. They emit a soft light without any modifiers and take up little space. Therefore they've
quickly become very popular in the film industry.